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On February 13, 2007, the CFI issued a decision stating that these marks, covering products in class 10, are dissimilar.

The Court took the view that the pertinent public was composed of both average consumers and a majority of health professionals. It considered EURO as the dominant element of EURON because the public was familiar with it, which is quite open to criticism.

The visual and phonetic difference between the letters C and E, also noted, would have been sufficient as the trademarks were short.

 

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